Monday, November 23, 2009

An Amazing Technicolor Scrap Tote

Time to change gears. Tomorrow I'm starting a series of grief quilts which have a Christmas deadline. This project is a sad one because the life being celebrated is that of a 31-year old young man. It's also difficult to put away all the bright fabrics I've been using. As I was cleaning up the studio, I used some of the scraps and made one final quilted tote. The effect of these scraps is terrific - I need to go off script more often!

9 comments:

wsrhodes said...

Love it!

Josie Ray said...

Busy, busy, we're holiday-busy already! :-) I hope to be around visiting soon, but, in the meantime, a warm and blessed Thanksgiving weekend to you and yours!

Hapi said...

hello... hapi blogging... have a nice day! just visiting here....

Josie Ray said...

Okay, I'm back with a plate of steaming T-day leftovers...yum! :-)

Soo...quilts are for giving away, but totes are for keeping? :-) This one, anyway? Keeping the quirky ones is surely like eating the few cookies leftover after you've made fifty Christmas cookie trays. The leftovers taste the best.

When you get a little time, I wonder...would you be willing to write a little more about what is a grief quilt exactly, or a series of them? And...well...should I ask? A little about the 31-year-old man, if it's not too tender a topic. Otherwise, no.

Donna said...

I do quilts from the clothes of dead people. It's not what I would want to do to grieve, but making quilts out of clothing seems to be something that some people use as a way to grieve. This 31-year old partied too hard and aspirated. His parents, brothers and niece/nephew want quilts. For the father and the niece/nephew, I'm doing small wall hangings - 2 by 2 or so. The 2 brothers and the mom both want bigger wall hangings, like 30 x 50. The mother for whom I did the stained-glass Mondrianesque quilt came over with all of her dead son's clothes and the son who was very very very close to the 31-year old. He sat in my studio and told me which of his brother's shirts he wanted in his quilt, which he wanted in another brothers quilt, and even picked out fabric for the sashing and borders. The mother just wants some of all of the clothes in her quilt.

I was giving myself a stern talking to about taking on a project like this during the holidays when I'd rather be doing fun projects when the phone rang. It was the brother who had been in my studio. He just wanted to share with me that he felt lighter leaving my studio and is looking forward to his quilt so that he can celebrate his brother's life instead of mourning his passing.

So, interesting, eh? My friendship with a grief counselor has taught me a lot. Another friend suggests I should charge for therapy as well as quilting. I religiously keep track of my time and supplies, so it does become a win-win situation for everyone. Today I relaxed. Tomorrow it's full steam ahead. Look at the "life celebration" quilts in my blog index.

And you're on the right path - off to get some leftovers!

(Quilts are for giving away, but totes are for selling. The latest quirky one was just purchased by a neighbor!)

Josie Ray said...

Goodness. I am just stunned by what you've written. I've never heard of anything like that and don't even know what to think of it and of someone like you...what it would take to be able to do all of that at Christmastime... Thank you for finding the words to explain. For some reason, this just really amazes me.

Donna said...

More than anything, Josie Ray, I think I'm honored that someone trusts me with what is often hardest to part with. Grief quilts are definitely a niche market. Often I like to balance these projects out with baby or wedding quilts. That's when I listen to The Lion King and "The Circle of Life."

Thanks for asking and for reading through all this...

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Donna said...

If you need any help with measurements or construction methods, contact me by email. I'd be happy to "coach" you through this process!